Mikhail Chemiakin’s Monument to Peter the First: A Site of Post-Imperial Self-Reflexivity

Caitlin Oakley (Russian Studies Program, College of William and Mary)

For Abstract of the Article in Russian Click Here. Чтобы прочитать краткое изложение статьи по-русски, нажмите кнопкой мышки здесь.

Over the course of the past two decades, Mikhail Chemiakin’s statue of Peter the First has received mixed responses.  At its unveiling on 7 June 1991, people were appalled at the monument’s irreverent representation of emperor, but in more recent years, some Petersburgers have developed if not liking at least some strange attachment to the statue. Despite being only 20 years old, the monument is already surrounded by legends and traditions.  The monument even received a nickname, the “Bronze-Stay-At-Home”.  My research seeks to compare and contrast the evolving representations of the monument in current travel guides, cultural histories, and oral accounts produced by the locals and international tourists.

[Read more…]

Mikhail Chemiakin’s Monument to Peter the First: A Site of Post-Imperial Self-Reflexivity

Caitlin Oakley (Russian Studies Program, College of William and Mary)

For Abstract of the Article in Russian Click Here. Чтобы прочитать краткое изложение статьи по-русски, нажмите кнопкой мышки здесь.

Over the course of the past two decades, Mikhail Chemiakin’s statue of Peter the First has received mixed responses.  At its unveiling on 7 June 1991, people were appalled at the monument’s irreverent representation of emperor, but in more recent years, some Petersburgers have developed if not liking at least some strange attachment to the statue. Despite being only 20 years old, the monument is already surrounded by legends and traditions.  The monument even received a nickname, the “Bronze-Stay-At-Home”.  My research seeks to compare and contrast the evolving representations of the monument in current travel guides, cultural histories, and oral accounts produced by the locals and international tourists.

[Read more…]

Mikhail Chemiakin’s Monument to Peter the First: A Site of Post-Imperial Self-Reflexivity

Caitlin Oakley (Russian Studies Program, College of William and Mary)

For Abstract of the Article in Russian Click Here. Чтобы прочитать краткое изложение статьи по-русски, нажмите кнопкой мышки здесь.

Over the course of the past two decades, Mikhail Chemiakin’s statue of Peter the First has received mixed responses.  At its unveiling on 7 June 1991, people were appalled at the monument’s irreverent representation of emperor, but in more recent years, some Petersburgers have developed if not liking at least some strange attachment to the statue. Despite being only 20 years old, the monument is already surrounded by legends and traditions.  The monument even received a nickname, the “Bronze-Stay-At-Home”.  My research seeks to compare and contrast the evolving representations of the monument in current travel guides, cultural histories, and oral accounts produced by the locals and international tourists.

[Read more…]

Mikhail Chemiakin’s Monument to Peter the First: A Site of Post-Imperial Self-Reflexivity

Caitlin Oakley (Russian Studies Program, College of William and Mary)

For Abstract of the Article in Russian Click Here. Чтобы прочитать краткое изложение статьи по-русски, нажмите кнопкой мышки здесь.

Over the course of the past two decades, Mikhail Chemiakin’s statue of Peter the First has received mixed responses.  At its unveiling on 7 June 1991, people were appalled at the monument’s irreverent representation of emperor, but in more recent years, some Petersburgers have developed if not liking at least some strange attachment to the statue. Despite being only 20 years old, the monument is already surrounded by legends and traditions.  The monument even received a nickname, the “Bronze-Stay-At-Home”.  My research seeks to compare and contrast the evolving representations of the monument in current travel guides, cultural histories, and oral accounts produced by the locals and international tourists.

[Read more…]

Mikhail Chemiakin’s Monument to Peter the First: A Site of Post-Imperial Self-Reflexivity

Caitlin Oakley (Russian Studies Program, College of William and Mary)

For Abstract of the Article in Russian Click Here. Чтобы прочитать краткое изложение статьи по-русски, нажмите кнопкой мышки здесь.

Over the course of the past two decades, Mikhail Chemiakin’s statue of Peter the First has received mixed responses.  At its unveiling on 7 June 1991, people were appalled at the monument’s irreverent representation of emperor, but in more recent years, some Petersburgers have developed if not liking at least some strange attachment to the statue. Despite being only 20 years old, the monument is already surrounded by legends and traditions.  The monument even received a nickname, the “Bronze-Stay-At-Home”.  My research seeks to compare and contrast the evolving representations of the monument in current travel guides, cultural histories, and oral accounts produced by the locals and international tourists.

[Read more…]

Works Cited: Mikhail Chemiakin’s Monument to Peter the First (Oakley)

Boym, Svetlana.  The Future of Nostalgia.  NY: Basic Books, 2001.

Evdokimova, Svetlana. Pushkin’s Historical Imagination. New Haven: Yale UP, 1999. Pg. Preface xiv. Print.

Goscilo, Helena, and Stephen M. Norris. Preserving Petersburg: History, Memory, Nostalgia. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2008. Pgs. 82-84. Print.

Howard, Jeremy, and Yuri Belinsky. National Geographic Traveler: St. Petersburg. National Geographic, 2007. Pg. 46. Print.

“Interview with Boris Koshelokhov”. Personal Interview.  6 July2011.

“Interview with Pavel Geskin”.  Personal Interview.  13 July 2011.

“Interview with Sergei Kovalsky.”  Personal Interview.  5 July 2011.

“Interview with Valentina Kirichesko”.  Personal Interview.  6 July 2011.

“Interview with Vladimir Rozov and Dima Mestsheniakov”  Personal Interview. 13 July 2011.

“Monuments and Memorials in St. Petersburg.” Saint-Petersburg.com – Travel and Event Guide for St Petersburg, Russia. Web. 09 May 2011. <http://www.saint-petersburg.com/monuments/index.asp>.

“Saint Petersburg Sights 2011: a travel guide to the top fifty attractions in St. Petersburg, Russia.” Mobile Reference.  Amazon Digital Services. March 24, 2011. Accessed 24 April 2011. Available from: <http://books.google.com/books?id=W9nT8K1RucUC&pg=PT187&lpg=PT187&dq=Monument+to+Peter+the+Great+%28by+Mikhail+Shemiakin%29&source=bl&ots=2xfFQhDX3r&sig=t5eM5Mek81fOMdsG6cOKqy1gMII&hl=en&ei=dDCzTfqINsKEtgftq8jpDg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CD4Q6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=semyakin&f=false>.

Volkov, Solomon, and Antonina W. Bouis. St. Petersburg: A Cultural History. New York: Free Paperbacks, 1997. Pgs. 486, 513, 541-42. Print.

Wilson, Derek A. Peter the Great. New York, NY: St. Martin’s, 2010. Pgs. 207-08. Print.

Zinovieff, Kyril, and Jenny Hughes. The Companion Guide to St. Petersburg. Woodbridge: Companion Guides, 2003. Pgs. 36-37. Print.

Back to Caitlin Oakley’s research paper

Кейтлин Окли/Памятник Петру Михаила Шемякина: Место памяти и постимперской само-рефлексии (Абстракт)

В моей работе я рассматриваю формы культурной памяти, функционирующие вокруг памятника Петру Первому, созданного Михаилом Шемякинным в конце двадцатого века.  Памятник был установлен в Петропавловской крепости в 1991ом году при активном участии первого демократически выбранного мэра Петербурга Анатолия Собчака. Среди повествовательных форм культурной памяти, которые я анализирую, путеводители по Петербургу, исторические монографии  по истории города, фокусирующиеся на поздне-советском периоде, лекции о роли Петра в истории России и интервью с жителями Петербурга.

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